Welcome!  Hymns have been and continue to be a real source of inspiration to me.  My desire in this blog is to share special hymns with my readers hoping that the words will minister to them, especially in times of great personal need.  If one of these hymns ministers to you, please take time to leave a comment so that I know that my blog is helping others as much as it helps me. Sometimes I will also provide a link where you can go to hear the hymn played.  So, please join me here each week and sing along as we praise God together.

Sunday, January 24, 2016

SAVED BY GRACE


          "For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God,  Not of works, lest any man should boast."  (Ephesians 2:8,9).  These powerful verses were the inspiration for Fanny Crosby, the author of this week's hymn choice.   L. H. Biglow, after attending a prayer-meeting conducted by Dr. Howard Crosby, asked Fanny Crosby to write a hymn on the subject of grace. She immediately retired to an adjoining room, and in the course of an hour returned with the words, "Some day the silver cord will break, and I no more as now shall sing."  Mr. Biglow secured the words from her, and put them in the safe among other hymns which she had written.  But the song was evidently forgotten.  It eventually came to public notice by accident, during a conference Fanny attended at Northfield, Massachusetts. During the meeting, the great evangelist, Dwight Moody, asked if Fanny would give a personal testimony to the audience. Not wanting to draw attention to herself, she almost declined, but finally got up to speak, and said, "There is one hymn I have written which has never been published. I call it my soul's poem. Sometimes when I am troubled, I repeat it to myself, for it brings comfort to my heart."  And she then closed her remarks by reciting the hymn which had never been heard before in public, "Saved By Grace".  A reporter of a London paper who was present at Northfield took her address, and also the hymn, and carried them back to England where he published the words in his paper. Four or five weeks later the words were handed to George C. Stebbins who set Fanny's words to music. During the following years the song became one of Mr. Moody's favorites, and since then has been sung by hundreds of thousands of people throughout the world. Some hymnals show the author as Ida Scott Taylor, one of Fanny's pseudonyms.  The hymn expresses the hope that all believers have because of God's great grace shown to us.  One day, hopefully soon, we will see our Lord, face to face.  I can't help but imagine that this was a special desire of Fanny, the blind hymn writer, to finally see, with her own eyes, the One who provided her salvation.  Someday that will be our joy and honor.


1      Some day the silver cord will break,
And I no more as now shall sing;
But oh, the joy when I shall wake
Within the palace of the King! 
And I shall see Him face to face,
And tell the story, Saved by grace; 
And I shall see Him face to face,
And tell the story, Saved by grace. 

2      Some day my earthly house will fall,
I cannot tell how soon 'twill be;
But this I know, my All in All
Has now a place in heav'n for me. 
And I shall see Him face to face,
And tell the story, Saved by grace; 
And I shall see Him face to face,
And tell the story, Saved by grace. 

3      Some day, when fades the golden sun
Beneath the rosy tinted west,
My blessed Lord will say, "Well done!"
And I shall enter into rest. 
And I shall see Him face to face,
And tell the story, Saved by grace; 
And I shall see Him face to face,
And tell the story, Saved by grace. 

4      Some day: till then I'll watch and wait,
My lamp all trimmed and burning bright,
That when my Savior opes the gate,
My soul to Him may take its flight. 
And I shall see Him face to face,
And tell the story, Saved by grace; 
And I shall see Him face to face,
And tell the story, Saved by grace. 

Listen to it here.   LISTEN

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