Welcome!  Hymns have been and continue to be a real source of inspiration to me.  My desire in this blog is to share special hymns with my readers hoping that the words will minister to them, especially in times of great personal need.  If one of these hymns ministers to you, please take time to leave a comment so that I know that my blog is helping others as much as it helps me. Sometimes I will also provide a link where you can go to hear the hymn played.  So, please join me here each week and sing along as we praise God together.

Sunday, December 8, 2019

VERILY, VERILY I SAY UNTO YOU




        How often today do we sing any gospel song that includes the phrase "verily, verily"?  It's not a word in our vocabulary today. But Jesus used the word verily many times as he taught.  It means truly or certainly.  Saying, "Verily, verily," before making a statement is a strong claim to its truth.   Jesus is not merely saying, "Believe me, this is true."  He is actually saying, "I know this is true firsthand." So, when we read Jesus' words and see statements beginning with "verily," "truly," or some variation, we should recall the deeper meaning. Those claims are not only Jesus' opinion on the truth. Those are ideas about which He has intimate, personal, firsthand knowledge.  And so that was the case when in John 5:24 Jesus said, "Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life."  As a result we should believe it and claim it. It is said that this was the favorite verse of James McGranahan (1840-1907) and also the motivation in 1878 for his writing of this week's hymn choice.  He  was an American Gospel song and hymn writer who  also wrote the music for such familiar hymns as "Christ Returneth!," "There Shall Be Showers of Blessing," and "The Banner of the Cross," as well as both the words and music for "Verily, Verily," and "Go Ye into All the World."  During his life he composed over 25 hymns.  Now this song of his is a song that I have not heard or sung in decades.  But it brings back many good memories of hearing it sung joyfully in services when I was growing up.  Think of the words.  What a thrill to know that He has set us free from all condemnation.  He paid all of our indebtedness.  And even though we are unworthy, weak and sinful, He will not cast us out.  And He assures us that we have everlasting life because of what He has done for us and our response to Him. Verily, verily - it's true!  What a great Savior!  Rejoice in this truth!


1     Oh, what a Savior that He died for me!
From condemnation He hath made me free;
"He that believeth on the Son" saith He,
"Hath everlasting life."
"Verily, verily, I say unto you;"
"Verily, verily," message ever new!
"He that believeth on the Son"-'tis true! -
 "Hath everlasting life!"

2     All my iniquities on Him were laid,
All my indebtedness by Him was paid;
All who believe on Him, the Lord hath said,
"Hath everlasting life."
"Verily, verily, I say unto you;"
"Verily, verily," message ever new!
"He that believeth on the Son" -'tis true! -
"Hath everlasting life!"

3     Though poor and needy, I can trust my Lord;
Though weak and sinful, I believe His word;
Oh, glad message; every child of God
"Hath everlasting life."
 Verily, verily, I say unto you;"
"Verily, verily," message ever new!
"He that believeth on the Son" -'tis true! -
"Hath everlasting life!"

4     Though all unworthy, yet I will not doubt;
For him that cometh He will not cast out:
"He that believeth" - oh, the good news shout!
 Hath everlasting life."
 Verily, verily, I say unto you;"
"Verily, verily," message ever new!
"He that believeth on the Son" - 'tis true! -
"Hath everlasting life!"

Listen to it here    VERILY

Sunday, December 1, 2019

THERE IS A FOUNTAIN FILLED WITH BLOOD (TH)


TIMELESS HYMN  - Another revised and repeated blog of one of the great hymns of the faith - There Is A Fountain Filled With Blood  - originally shared here on June 6, 2010.


          William Cowper (1731 - 1800) studied to become an attorney but he never actually practiced law. He struggled from manic depression and often felt that he was doomed to eternal damnation and hell. He made several attempts at drinking poison only to have spasms in his hand which prevented him from doing so. He then tried to hang himself with a strong garter. He passed out and then the garter broke while he was still suspended. He struggled with knowing that God could forgive him for this attempt. After having significant difficulties battling depression, he had a mental breakdown and was sent to a mental hospital. There Cowper found a Bible on a bench. He opened it and read it. He turned to the account of Lazarus being raised from the dead, which he said showed him the mercy of the Savior. He also turned to Romans 3:25 where he read, “Christ Jesus, whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness.” It was upon reading this verse that Cowper said he was immediately converted.  Cowper was able to regain his mental health, and he left the hospital. He ended up in the town of Olney where John Newton was a pastor. Newton recognized Cowper’s gift as a poet, and he encouraged him to write hymns. And that Cowper did. He wrote sixty-eight hymns in a fairly short period of time. Today's hymn was the first hymn he wrote after his recovery. It is evident that the Lord worked in him and gave him the assurance of forgiveness. There are many interesting stories told about the impact of this great hymn. One has to do with a large religious service conducted at the Golden Gate Exposition in San Francisco. The gifted speaker began to direct most of his eloquence against the power of the blood of Christ. When he was done, an elderly lady stood up in the midst of the crowd and softly began to sing this hymn as a touching rebuttal to the speaker's remarks. A hush fell over the audience as they listened. But before she could begin the second verse, about one hundred people rose to join her. By the time they reached the third verse, nearly a thousand were singing along. The triumphant, thrilling strains rang out - "Dear dying Lamb, Thy precious blood shall never lose its power, 'til all the ransomed church of God be saved to sin no more." The message, written by one cured by the Lord from deep depression, still rings out today in the hearts of those who've experienced the power of the blood of Christ.  Have you experienced this power and transformation?

(1) There is a fountain filled with blood
drawn from Emmanuel's veins;
and sinners plunged beneath that flood
lose all their guilty stains.
Lose all their guilty stains,
lose all their guilty stains;
and sinners plunged beneath that flood
lose all their guilty stains.

(2) The dying thief rejoiced to see
that fountain in his day;
and there may I, though vile as he,
wash all my sins away.
Wash all my sins away,
wash all my sins away;
and there may I, though vile as he,
wash all my sins away.

(3) Dear dying Lamb, thy precious blood
shall never lose its power
till all the ransomed church of God
be saved, to sin no more.
Be saved, to sin no more,
be saved, to sin no more;
till all the ransomed church of God
be saved, to sin no more.

(4) E'er since, by faith, I saw the stream
thy flowing wounds supply,
redeeming love has been my theme,
and shall be till I die.
And shall be till I die,
and shall be till I die;
redeeming love has been my theme,
and shall be till I die.

(5) Then in a nobler, sweeter song,
I'll sing thy power to save,
when this poor lisping, stammering tongue
lies silent in the grave.
Lies silent in the grave,
lies silent in the grave;
when this poor lisping, stammering tongue
lies silent in the grave.

Listen to it here. LISTEN

Sunday, November 24, 2019

COME CHRISTIAN, JOIN TO SING

          My wife and I are big Penn State football fans.  Before our physical challenges prevented us from going, we often were able to attend five or six home games each year.  We enjoyed the enthusiasm of the band, the excitement of the fans and the general atmosphere.  It was stirring to hear the 105,000 fans cheer “We are ... Penn State!”  Now we watch the games on television but we miss the thrill of being there. Sports fans can be enthusiastic. Likewise, concertgoers raise their hands and swoon at rock stars. Supporters clap, cheer and throw confetti for leading politicians. So why shouldn’t Christians unite their hearts, souls and minds and raise their voices and cheer for the lover of souls, the giver of good things, the creator of the universe, the all-powerful glorious one, the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end?  “O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise.” (Psalm 51:15).  King David was eager to worship. “I was glad when they said to me, ‘Let us go to the house of the Lord!’” (Psalm 122:1). And he had so much enthusiasm, dancing before the Lord when the ark returned to Jerusalem, that his wife was embarrassed by his behavior (2 Samuel 6:14-16).  Christian Henry Bateman (1813-1899) was ordained into the Church of England after being a Congregational minister.  He is credited as being the author of this hymn although there are some who believe that Bateman’s hymn is actually  a rewritten version of the hymn “Join Now in Praise, and Sing” by William Edward Hickson (1803-1870).  But no matter who actually wrote it, the hymn is a challenge to Christians to join in praising the Creator.  Each stanza begins with an exhortation - an imperative command to “Come” or “Praise.” In stanza one, Bateman provides us with the reason for singing - We offer “loud praise to Christ our King  ... before his throne ... ”   Christ desires our praise - “praise is his gracious choice. . . .”  Stanza two reassures all of us that this King is also “our guide and friend” and that “his love shall never end.”  This King will “condescend” to be our friend. To condescend surely did not mean to patronize as it tends to mean today, but implies that Christ the King humbles himself to be in a personal relationship with us.  Stanza three reassures us that we need not fear death. Beyond life, our songs will continue on “heaven’s blissful shore  ...  singing forevermore: Alleluia! Amen!”  Football games and concerts are fun. Political events are important. But a greater priority is to worship God. Why not praise Him with the enthusiasm of a Super Bowl fan, the adoration of a music enthusiast, and the zeal of a political supporter?  Pray for this nation to recognize the awesomeness of God and give Him the praise due to His name.

1    Come, Christians, join to sing
Alleluia! Amen!
loud praise to Christ our King;
Alleluia! Amen!
let all, with heart and voice,
before his throne rejoice;
praise is his gracious choice.
Alleluia! Amen!

2    Come, lift your hearts on high,
Alleluia! Amen!
let praises fill the sky;
Alleluia! Amen!
he is our Guide and Friend;
to us he’ll condescend;
his love shall never end.
Alleluia! Amen!

3    Praise yet our Christ again,
Alleluia! Amen!
life shall not end the strain;
Alleluia! Amen!
on heaven’s blissful shore,
his goodness we’ll adore,
singing forevermore,
"Alleluia! Amen!”


Listen to it here.  COME

Sunday, November 17, 2019

HELD IN HIS MIGHTY ARMS



        "The eternal God is your Refuge and underneath are the everlasting arms."  Deuteronomy 33:27.   "The arms of the wicked shall be broken, but the Lord upholds the righteous"  Psalm 37:17.  Possibly you have good memories of being held in the arms of a parent.  It was a place of comfort and safety, a secure retreat from the cares of your world.  Now in my senior years I often wish that I could again escape to those arms of love and protection of my parents.  But believers do have the everlasting arms of God which are always there to protect and comfort us.  Now we know God is spirit and doesn't have arms as we do. However, the imagery is used in Scripture to convey the idea of His limitless power.  One who believed and experienced this was Winfield Macomber (1865-1896).  He came to Christ at age 16, then worked distributing materials for the American Bible Society. In 1890, he enrolled at the New York Missionary Training Institute (later renamed Nyack College), and in 1892 went to the Congo for the International Missionary Alliance. He returned to America a year later for health reasons, and in 1894 began teaching the Congolese language at his alma mater. He compiled an English-Fioti grammar and dictionary for use by missionaries, and, in 1896, he returned to missionary work in the Congo. But once again, ill health forced his departure but he never made it back to America.  He died in Portugal at the age of forty-one.  His was a short life, but one of lasting influence. And he was safe in God's keeping until his work here was done and then he was lifted to his heavenly rest in the Lord's loving arms. But he left behind a hymn which may have been his testimony.  "Oh! what wonderful, wonderful rest! trusting completely in Jesus I'm blest. Sweetly He comforts and shields from alarms, holding me safe in His mighty arms."  If today you are facing difficult challenges in your life, then flee to His almighty, everlasting arms and experience the rest and comfort which is there for you.


1.    Safe is my refuge, sweet is my rest,
Ill cannot harm me, nor foes e'er molest;
Jesus my spirit so tenderly calms,
Holding me close in His mighty arms.
Refrain
Oh! what wonderful, wonderful rest!
Trusting completely in Jesus I'm blest;
Sweetly He comforts and shields from alarms,
Holding me safe in His mighty arms.

2.    Pressing my tear stained cheek to His own,
Hushing my grief with His sweet gentle tone;
Touching my heart with His healing balms,
Holding me still in His mighty arms. 
Refrain
Oh! what wonderful, wonderful rest!
Trusting completely in Jesus I'm blest;
Sweetly He comforts and shields from alarms,
Holding me safe in His mighty arms.


3.    Tempests may rage, sin's surges may beat,
Ne'er can they reach my sheltered retreat;
Free from all danger, from dread alarms,
Resting so safe in His mighty arms.
Refrain
Oh! what wonderful, wonderful rest!
Trusting completely in Jesus I'm blest;
Sweetly He comforts and shields from alarms,
Holding me safe in His mighty arms.

Listen to it here.   ARMS

Sunday, November 10, 2019

MY WONDERFUL LORD

          It is hard to find words meaningful enough to describe the Lord and His relationship to His children. Like many hymn writers, Haldor Lillenas (1885 – 1959) chose to use the word wonderful - "inspiring delight, pleasure, or admiration; extremely good; marvelous". in this week's hymn choice.  And truly the Lord is wonderful.  And as we yield our all, our body and soul, to Him we experience the deep peace which He provides to His children.  The Bible reminds us of the need to dedicate our lives to the Lord. "I beseech (urge) you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that you present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, which is your reasonable service" (Rom. 12:1). Lillenas was born in Norway and at the age of two immigrated with his mother and two brothers to South Dakota.  Lillenas indicated that soon after his conversion at the age of 21,  he began to increasingly write hymns and songs that expressed his faith and joy. Lillenas was a prolific composer of hymns, and it is estimated that he wrote some 4,000 hymns, and supplied songs for many evangelists.  In 1924 he founded the Lillenas Music Co. in Indianapolis.  Now I must admit that I struggled for quite some time before sharing this week's hymn  because of the phrase in the chorus, "I bow at Thy shrine, my Saviour divine."  What shrine?  And why would I bow at some shrine?   He is not dead. His tomb is empty. He is now seated on a royal throne, at the right hand of the Father in heaven as our Intercessor.  Robert Catrill. in his blog Wordwise Hymns, suggests changing this line to: "I know Thou art mine,"   I agree and have made that change in the words below.  After making that change, I challenge you to claim these words as your testimony.  Have you yielded your all to the Lord?  Have you found the deep peace that results from this dedication?  Indeed, our Lord, the ancient of days, is deserving of all our praise.  Is He your wonderful, wonderful Lord?  Have you yielded your all to Him?

1     I have found a deep peace
that I never had known
And a joy this world could not afford
Since I yielded control of my body and soul
To my wonderful, wonderful Lord.
My wonderful Lord, my wonderful Lord 
By angels and seraphs
in Heaven adored
I know Thou art mine!
My Savior divine
My wonderful, wonderful Lord

2     All the talents I have I have laid at thy feet
Thy approval shall be my reward.
Be my store great or small
I surrender it all
To my wonderful, wonderful Lord.
My wonderful Lord, my wonderful Lord
By angels and seraphs in Heaven adored!
I know Thou art mine!
my Savior divine
My wonderful, wonderful Lord.
Wonderful, wonderful
My Lord is wonderful

3     Thou art fairer to me than the fairest of earth
Thou omnipotent, life-giving Word
O Thou Ancient of Days,
Thou art worthy of all praise,
My wonderful, wonderful Lord.
My wonderful Lord, my wonderful Lord
By angels and seraphs in Heaven adored!
I know Thou art mine!
my Savior divine
My wonderful, wonderful Lord.
Wonderful, wonderful
My Lord is wonderful

Listen to it here.   WONDERFUL

Sunday, November 3, 2019

LEANING ON THE EVERLASTING ARMS (TH)


TIMELESS HYMN  - Another revised and repeated blog of one of the great hymns of the faith originally shared here on June 27, 2010.

         It is always amazing to me how the Lord takes a person who has little or no training and uses them to create music which ministers to the hearts of many for many decades. Such is the case with Elisha Hoffman who penned over two thousand compositions and edited over fifty hymnals during his lifetime. Many of his hymns have been shared in this blog over the years. He is said to have been a natural musician and all the musical knowledge he had was gained by personal application. Mr. Hoffman's first impressions of music came from hearing the voice of sacred song in his home. It is said that his parents both had "sweet voices" and sang well. It was their custom, in the hour of family worship, both morning and evening, to sing one or two hymns. At an early age, the children became familiar with these hymns and learned to love them and to feel their power. Their lives were marvelously influenced by this little service of song in the home and a taste for sacred music was created and developed. It is sad that this custom seldom happens in homes today. Growing up my family sang together regularly, especially while we were traveling in the car. I've retained so many great hymns because of this experience. The little bit of background that I could find about this week's hymn choice indicates that Anthony Showalter actually wrote the chorus. With his need to comfort two friends who had dear ones that had just died, he sent his lyrics to Hoffman who then penned the verses. And these words continue to be a comfort to many today as we learn that leaning on the everlasting arms keeps us safe, provides real joy and peace, and allows us to face the future without dread or fear. A place of safety and security - the everlasting arms of Christ.

(1)    What a fellowship, what a joy divine,
Leaning on the everlasting arms;
What a blessedness, what a peace is mine,
Leaning on the everlasting arms.
Leaning, leaning, safe and secure from all alarms;
Leaning, leaning, leaning on the everlasting arms.

(2)    Oh, how sweet to walk in this pilgrim way,
Leaning on the everlasting arms;
Oh, how bright the path grows from day to day,
Leaning on the everlasting arms.
Leaning, leaning, safe and secure from all alarms;
Leaning, leaning, leaning on the everlasting arms.

(3)    What have I to dread, what have I to fear,
Leaning on the everlasting arms?
I have blessed peace with my Lord so near,
Leaning on the everlasting arms.
Leaning, leaning, safe and secure from all alarms;
Leaning, leaning, leaning on the everlasting arms.

Listen it here. LEAN

Sunday, October 27, 2019

THE SPACIOUS FIRMAMENT ON HIGH



        "The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of His hands" Psalm 19:1.  As a mathematician I am continuously amazed at our universe which for centuries has continued to operate with precision on a perfect schedule.  Because of the order in which it moves it is possible to accurately predict where stars and planets will be at any time in the future.  Low and high tides can be perfectly predicted. Incredible!  The moon moves around the earth every 27.3 days,  The moon orbits quite fast, 0.5 degrees per hour in the sky. In 24 hours it moves 13 degrees. The average distance between earth and the sun is 149.60 million km (92.96 million mi), and one complete orbit takes 365.256 days during which time earth has traveled 940 million km (584 million mi). There are about 10 billion galaxies in the observable universe! The number of stars in a galaxy varies, but assuming an average of 100 billion stars per galaxy means that there are about 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (that's 1 billion trillion) stars in the observable universe!  It is hard to even comprehend the size of the universe and how it moves.  But this we know - all of this spacious firmament was created and controlled by a God who also loves us and cares for us.  And that, too, is incredible.  A hymn which points out the need to be conscious of God as the one whose glory is declared by the heavens and the earth which He created is "The Spacious Firmament on High." The text was written by Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719). This great hymn, based on Ps. 19:1-6, appeared in The Spectator, a weekly paper edited by the author. It was appended to an article he wrote called "An Essay on the Proper Means of Strengthening and Confirming Faith in the Mind of Man." There, he said, "Faith and devotion naturally grow in the mind of every reasonable man, who sees the impression of divine power and wisdom in every object on which he casts his eye. The Supreme Being has made the best arguments for His own existence in the formation of the heavens and the earth. Appropriately, the tune used for the hymn, called Creation, is adapted from "The Heavens Are Telling," a chorus in the 1798 oratorio The Creation, by Franz Josef Haydn (1732 - 1809).  In Addison's hymn stanza 1 describes the day time sky.  Stanza 2 describes the night time sky and stanza 3 describes the silence of the celestial objects.  Let's make it a point this week to view and consider the spacious firmament created by our Father.  Then bow in worship and adoration to the Great Creator who also loved us enough to provide a way in which we can come into His presence.  May we never lose the awe of this truth.

1.     The spacious firmament on high,
With all the blue ethereal sky,
And spangled heavens, a shining frame
Their great Original proclaim.
Th'unwearied sun, from day to day,
Does his creator's powers display,
And publishes to every land
The work of an almighty hand.

2.     Soon as the evening shades prevail
The moon takes up the wondrous tale,
And nightly to the listening earth
Repeats the story of her birth;
While all the stars that round her burn
And all the planets in their turn,
Confirm the tidings as they roll,
And spread the truth from pole to pole.

3.     What though in solemn silence all
Move round the dark terrestrial ball?
What though no real voice nor sound
Amid the radiant orbs be found?
In reason's ear they all rejoice,
And utter forth a glorious voice,
Forever singing as they shine,
The hand that made us is divine.

Listen to it here  FIRMAMENT
Here you can also see and hear one of my favorite musicians, George Beverly Shea, sing this hymn.   SHEA

Sunday, October 20, 2019

IS YOUR ALL ON THE ALTAR OF SACRIFICE LAID?



        "I appeal to you therefore, brothers,[ by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship."  (Romans 12:1 ESV). Now the Bible makes it plain that no one will ever get to heaven by his or her own efforts. Salvation is by the grace of God - His unmerited favor - "not of works lest anyone should boast" (Eph. 2:8-9).  But what about our lives after salvation?  If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit" (Gal. 3:3; 5:25).  The Word of God describes Christian  living as a walk of faith and a life of surrender to the will of God.  But sacrifice and surrender are terms that we seldom here about anymore in messages or church music.  But, as someone has said, He is either Lord of all, or not Lord at all. Full surrender affects all areas of one's life, including the checkbook, the calendar, entertainment choices, jobs and relationships. All of these need to be placed on the altar of sacrifice.  It is in full surrender to the will of God that we find true peace and joy, and fulfillment in life. That is the theme of this week's gospel song choice, written by American pastor Elisha Hoffman (1839-1929). Mr. Hoffman's first impressions of music came from hearing the voice of sacred song in his home. It was the custom of his parents in the hour of family worship, both morning and evening, to sing one or two hymns. At an early age, the children became familiar with these hymns and learned to love them and to feel their hallowing and refining power. Their lives were marvelously influenced by this little service of song in the home.  Hoffman wrote over two thousand songs, often writing both. the words and the music.   Among his most popular and useful songs are: "What a Wonderful Saviour!," "Enough for Me," "Are You Washed in the Blood?," "No Other Friend Like Jesus,"and  "I Must Tell Jesus".  In this particular song he reminds us that  "You can only be blest, and have peace and sweet rest as you yield Him your body and soul."  And so the question we need to ask daily is, have we placed our all on the altar of sacrifice.  Does He control both our body and soul?  Are we experiencing the real joy and peace that comes when we yield all to Him?

1.   You have longed for sweet peace,
And for faith to increase,
And have earnestly, fervently prayed;
But you cannot have rest,
Or be perfectly blest,
Until all on the altar is laid.
Refrain:
Is your all on the altar of sacrifice laid?
Your heart does the Spirit control?
You can only be blest,
And have peace and sweet rest,
As you yield Him your body and soul.

2.   Would you walk with the Lord,
In the light of His word,
And have peace and contentment alway?
You must do His sweet will,
To be free from all ill,
On the altar your all you must lay.
Refrain

3.    Oh, we never can know
What the Lord will bestow
Of the blessings for which we have prayed,
Till our body and soul
He doth fully control,
And our all on the altar is laid.
Refrain

4.   Who can tell all the love
He will send from above,
And how happy our hearts will be made;
Of the fellowship sweet
We shall share at His feet,
When our all on the altar is laid
Refrain.

Here are two choices for you to listen to:

Sunday, October 13, 2019

JUST WHEN I NEED HIM MOST



        Often life comes at us fast and hard.  An accident, a telephone call, a medical test result, a large bill, a damaging storm, and many other unexpected things can suddenly strike us with bad news.  And so often when these things happen it is hard to get help or advice and your burden might seem too heavy to bear.  It might take a week or more to get an appointment with a doctor or specialist.  The repairman might be booked up for a couple of days.  Your best friend might be on vacation.  What do you do?  Where do you get help?  Well there is One who never goes on vacation, never is sleeping, never is too busy, has all the answers and wants to help and provide the wisdom and peace that you need.  No appointments are needed.  No busy signals.  No lengthy menus to sift through for help.  He is always there, just when you need him most - in the middle of the night, during a storm, when you are all alone, when sleep won't come, when you are fearful, when you are facing a decision or a confrontation. In fact, He urges us to cast all of our burdens on Him.  "Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you."  (1 Peter 5:7).  Jesus has promised never to leave us or forsake us.  He is always there, ready to help and ready to cheer.  Just when we need Him most.   This hymn of testimony was penned in 1907 by William C. Poole (1875-1949) who was raised on a farm in Maryland.  He is said to have written about five hundred hymns.  The writing was done as recreation and a diversion from his pastoral work. He said that his goal in writing, as well as in being a minister, was to help people.  And I am sure that he has helped many through this week's hymn choice.  Hopefully you have found the words of this hymn true in your life.  "Just when I need Him, He is my all, answering when upon Him I call; Tenderly watching lest I should fall, just when I need Him most."  What a marvelous truth!  


1.     Just when I need Him, Jesus is near,
Just when I falter, just when I fear;
Ready to help me, ready to cheer,
Just when I need Him most.
Refrain:
Just when I need Him most,
Just when I need Him most,
Jesus is near to comfort and cheer,
Just when I need Him most.

2.     Just when I need Him, Jesus is true,
Never forsaking, all the way through;
Giving for burdens pleasures anew,
Just when I need Him most
Refrain:
Just when I need Him most,
Just when I need Him most,
Jesus is near to comfort and cheer,
Just when I need Him most.

2.      Just when I need Him, Jesus is strong,
Bearing my burdens all the day long;
For all my sorrow giving a song,
Just when I need Him most.
Refrain:
Just when I need Him most,
Just when I need Him most,
Jesus is near to comfort and cheer,
Just when I need Him most.

4.     Just when I need Him, He is my all,
Answering when upon Him I call;
Tenderly watching lest I should fall,
Just when I need Him most.
Refrain:
Just when I need Him most,
Just when I need Him most,
Jesus is near to comfort and cheer,
Just when I need Him most.

Listen to it here.   NEED

Sunday, October 6, 2019

LEAVE IT THERE (TH)


TIMELESS HYMN - Another revised and repeated blog of one of the great hymns of the faith originally shared on May 2, 2010.



          "Cast your cares on the Lord and he will sustain you."  Psalm 55:22.  Charles A. Tindley is known as one of the "founding fathers of American Gospel music".  The son of slaves, he taught himself to read and write at age 17. He was a driven young man, working as a janitor while attending night school, and earning his divinity degree through a correspondence course. In 1902, he became pastor of the Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the church where he had earlier been the janitor. At the time of Tindley's death, his church had 12,500 members. The Tindley Temple United Methodist Church in Philadelphia was named after him. Tindley's "I'll Overcome Some Day" was the basis for the American civil rights anthem "We Shall Overcome," popularized in the 1960's.   But back in 1916 a fellow who was a constant worrier visited Tindley one day. After listening awhile, Tindley replied: "My advice to you is put all your troubles in a sack, take 'em to the Lord, and leave 'em there." I had forgotten about this old hymn until I recently heard it sung on a favorites program on our local Christian radio station. I then remembered how this used to be a favorite hymn which was often sung in church and prayer meetings when I was growing up. It is also an old male quartet favorite that I often sang in my days on the radio with the Gospel Four. It has so many great thoughts, especially for those facing trials and for those of us who are worriers. What is the best thing you can do with those trials and worries?  Take them to the Lord … and leave them there.  Are you carrying some burdens today that are too heavy for you to bear?  Then just take those burdens to the Lord and leave them there ... there is nothing too heavy for Him to bear. "Praise be to the Lord, to God our Savior, who daily bears our burdens."  Psalm 68:19.

(1) If the world from you withhold of its silver and its gold,
And you have to get along with meager fare,
Just remember, in His Word, how He feeds the little bird;
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.
Leave it there, leave it there,
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.
If you trust and never doubt, He will surely bring you out.
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.

(2) If your body suffers pain and your health you can't regain,
And your soul is almost sinking in despair,
Jesus knows the pain you feel, He can save and He can heal;
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.
Leave it there, leave it there,
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.
If you trust and never doubt, He will surely bring you out.
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.

3) When your enemies assail and your heart begins to fail,
Don't forget that God in Heaven answers prayer;
He will make a way for you and will lead you safely through.
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.
Leave it there, leave it there,
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.
If you trust and never doubt, He will surely bring you out.
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.

(4) When your youthful days are gone and old age is stealing on,
And your body bends beneath the weight of care;
He will never leave you then, He'll go with you to the end.
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there
Leave it there, leave it there,
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.
If you trust and never doubt, He will surely bring you out.
Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there.

Listen to it here.   BURDEN

Sunday, September 29, 2019

IN TENDERNESS HE SOUGHT ME


          "Great are Thy tender mercies, O Lord." ( Psalm 119:156)  Praise God for His great tender mercies to His children - love that sought us when we strayed from Him, blood that bought us from the penalty of sin, and wondrous grace that brought us to His fold.    William Spencer Walton was born in London, saved when he was twenty-two, served the Lord first in evening evangelism, then served full time in the British Isles, and lastly in South Africa.  During his first trip to South Africa in 1888, hundreds were saved. Walton then returned to England where he established the Cape General Mission in 1889. While in England he married Kathleen Dixon, who also served in South Africa. Sadly, after only ten months together, Kathleen died in childbirth.   In 1893, Walton married Lena Gibson, and they continued giving the gospel of Christ in South Africa through war, famine, and plagues. In 1904, the mission sent the Waltons and their three children to North America and Britain. During their travels,Walton was taken ill and died at the age of fifty-six.   Walton's missionary work is known mainly through the books and pamphlets he wrote. He is also credited with one hymn, In Tenderness He Sought Me, published in 1894.  In this hymn he used references to  several Biblical examples to illustrate God's tender mercies.  He referred in the first verse to the parable (Luke 15:3-7) of the man who had a hundred sheep, lost one, and left the ninety-nine in the wilderness in order to seek after the one which was lost. This shows how God the Son went out of his way to find us and brings us home.  In the second verse he referred to the parable of the Good Samaritan found in Luke chapter 10.  "He washed the bleeding sin-wounds, and poured in oil and wine."  And then in the third verse there are references to the sacrifice of Christ for us at Calvary.  Oh what love was demonstrated there.   And then verses four and five share what should be the experience of each believer as we wait for that glorious day when we shall be called to His side to be with Him eternally.  What a glorious hope is ours.  How great are His tender mercies - love, blood and grace - to His children.



1.     In tenderness He sought me,
Weary and sick with sin,
And on His shoulders brought me
Into His flock again.
While angels in His presence sang
Until the courts of heaven rang.
Oh, the love that sought me!
Oh, the blood that bought me!
Oh, the grace that brought me to the fold,
Wondrous grace that brought me to the fold!

2.     He washed the bleeding sin-wounds,
And poured in oil and wine;
He whispered to assure me,
"I've found thee, thou art Mine:"
I never heard a sweeter voice,
It made my aching heart rejoice.
Oh, the love that sought me!
Oh, the blood that bought me!
Oh, the grace that brought me to the fold,
Wondrous grace that brought me to the fold!

3.     He pointed to the nail-prints,
For me His blood was shed;
A mocking crown so thorny,
Was placed upon His head:
Oh, the love that sought me!
Oh, the blood that bought me!
Oh, the grace that brought me to the fold,
Wondrous grace that brought me to the fold!

4.     I'm sitting in His presence,
The sunshine of His face,
While with adoring wonder
His blessings I retrace.
It seems as if eternal days
Are far too short to sound His praise.
Oh, the love that sought me!
Oh, the blood that bought me!
Oh, the grace that brought me to the fold,
Wondrous grace that brought me to the fold!

5.     So while the hours are passing,
All now is perfect rest,
I'm waiting for the morning,
The brightest and the best,
When He will call us to His side,
To be with Him, His spotless bride.
Oh, the love that sought me!
Oh, the blood that bought me!
Oh, the grace that brought me to the fold,
Wondrous grace that brought me to the fold!

Listen to it here.   LOVE