Welcome!  Hymns have been and continue to be a real source of inspiration to me.  My desire in this blog is to share special hymns with my readers hoping that the words will minister to them, especially in times of great personal need.  If one of these hymns ministers to you, please take time to leave a comment so that I know that my blog is helping others as much as it helps me. Sometimes I will also provide a link where you can go to hear the hymn played.  So, please join me here each week and sing along as we praise God together.

Sunday, April 15, 2018

IT IS WELL WITH MY SOUL


          Probably the most known story of the events behind the writing of a hymn is the story of Horatio Spafford and "It Is Well With My Soul".  He penned the words and it was composed by Philip Bliss in 1876.  Spafford was a successful lawyer and businessman in Chicago with a lovely family of five children. However, they were not strangers to tears and tragedy. Their young son died with pneumonia in 1871, and in that same year much of their business was lost in the great Chicago fire. Yet God in His mercy and kindness allowed the business to flourish once more.  On Nov. 21, 1873, the French ocean liner, Ville du Havre, was crossing the Atlantic from the U.S. to Europe with 313 passengers on board. These included Mrs. Spafford and their four daughters. Although Mr. Spafford had planned to go with his family, he found it necessary to stay in Chicago to help solve an unexpected business problem. He told his wife he would join her and their children in Europe a few days later. About four days into the crossing the Atlantic the liner collided with a Scottish ship and suddenly all of those on board were in grave danger. Anna hurriedly brought her children to the deck and prayed that God would spare them if that could be His will or make them willing to endure whatever awaited them. Within approximately 12 minutes, the liner slipped beneath the dark waters of the Atlantic, carrying with it 226 of the passengers including the four Spafford children. A sailor, rowing a small boat over the spot where the ship went down, spotted a woman floating on a piece of the wreckage. It was Anna, still alive. He pulled her into the boat and they were picked up by another large vessel. Nine days later she wired her husband a message which began, "Saved alone, what shall I do?"  Spafford booked passage on the next available ship and left to join his grieving wife. With the ship about four days out, the captain called Spafford to his cabin and told him they were over the place where his children went down.  According to Bertha Spafford Vester, a daughter born after the tragedy, Spafford wrote "It Is Well With My Soul" while on this journey.  In the centuries since then this hymn has been a great source of comfort and encouragement to millions who have faced sorrows, like sea billows, and have experienced the peace that only our great God can provide.  On a personal note, many years ago the mother of my future daughter-in-law testified in church that she had just learned that she needed a second heart valve replacement.   She had accepted the bad news with the words "But it is well with my soul!".  Shortly after that testimony the Lord suddenly took her home with a heart attack.  Those of us who heard her testimony have had a difficult time singing this hymn since then without  tears of remembrance.  But we thank the Lord that she had this peace and confidence.  What about you?  Do you know it is well with your soul?  Can you face the future with that confidence?  "And the peace of God which surpasses all understanding, shall keep your hearts, your minds through Christ Jesus."  Philippians 4:7.   Not all hymn books have included all the verses of this great hymn and some have modified some of the words. Verses four and five are seldom included.  But I've chosen to list all the verses of this great hymn as originally written, for your encouragement.


1.     When peace like a river, attendeth my way,
When sorrows like sea billows roll;
Whatever my lot, Thou hast taught me to know
It is well, it is well, with my soul.
It is well, (it is well),
With my soul, (with my soul)
It is well, it is well, with my soul.

2.    Though Satan should buffet, though trials should come,
Let this blest assurance control,
That Christ has regarded my helpless estate,
And hath shed His own blood for my soul.
It is well, it is well, with my soul.
It is well, (it is well),
With my soul, (with my soul)
It is well, it is well, with my soul.

3.    My sin, oh, the bliss of this glorious thought!
My sin, not in part but the whole,
Is nailed to the cross, and I bear it no more,
Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, O my soul!
It is well, it is well, with my soul.
It is well, (it is well),
With my soul, (with my soul)
It is well, it is well, with my soul.

4.    For me, be it Christ, be it Christ hence to live:
If Jordan above me shall roll,
No pang shall be mine, for in death as in life,
Thou wilt whisper Thy peace to my soul.
It is well, it is well, with my soul.
It is well, (it is well),
With my soul, (with my soul)
It is well, it is well, with my soul.

5.     But Lord, 'tis for Thee, for Thy coming we wait,
The sky, not the grave, is our goal;
Oh, trump of the angel! Oh, voice of the Lord!
Blessed hope, blessed rest of my soul.
It is well, it is well, with my soul.
It is well, (it is well),
With my soul, (with my soul)
It is well, it is well, with my soul.

6.     And Lord, haste the day when my faith shall be sight,
The clouds be rolled back as a scroll;
The trump shall resound, and the Lord shall descend,
A song in the night, oh my soul! 
It is well, it is well, with my soul.
It is well, (it is well),
With my soul, (with my soul)
It is well, it is well, with my soul.

Listen to a unique and beautiful a cappella rendition here.   LISTEN1
Here is a second choice done by Selah  LISTEN2

Sunday, April 8, 2018

I WALK WITH THE KING


          The Appalachian Trail is about 2,200 miles long, stretching from Georgia to Maine.  Most of it is mountains, some gentle slopes but much very rugged terrain.  It includes many beautiful vistas but also is very dangerous not only with steep mountains and cliffs, but also wild animals.  Those who hike the entire trail take an average of 165 rigorous days of hiking to complete it.  I have a friend who recently completed that fete, but he did it in three parts over a few years.  And he did it alone.  I personally would not even try it, but if I did I would want to have a friend accompany me.  A friend could not only keep me company, but could help guide me and protect me from the many challenges and dangers of the trail.  In many ways hiking the Appalachian Trail is similar to our trail of life. There are many very good days along the way, but there are also many steep paths and challenges that we will encounter.  Sometimes life can be very difficult.  But at the end of our trail there is a beautiful eternal home for the believer.  However, the real beauty of our journey is that believers have a companion who is right beside us, all the way.  We have the presence of the King!  We have His guidance.  We have His provision.  We have His protection.  We have His comfort. And we have His companionship!  What more could we want or need?  This old hymn, written in 1913 by James Rowe, is seldom heard or sung today.  A friend recently reminded me of it when she shared how, while growing up, her family used to often sing it.  I also remember the "old-timers" singing it in weekly prayer meetings.  I could find little about the origin of the hymn except that Rowe was born in England in 1865.  He came to America in 1890 where he worked for ten years for the New York Central and Hudson R. R. Co., then served for twelve years as superintendent of the Mohawk and Hudson River Humane Society. He began writing songs and hymns about 1896 and was a prolific writer of gospel verse with more than 9,000 published hymns, poems, recitations, and other works.  And this hymn of his encourages us as we are reminded that we walk with the King along the rugged trail of life here on earth. And He promised to never leave us or forsake us.   "I walk with the King, hallelujah!  I walk with the King, praise His Name!  No longer I roam, my soul faces home, I walk and I talk with the King."    


1.   In sorrow I wandered, my spirit oppressed,
But now I am happy, securely I rest;
From morning till evening glad carols I sing,
And this is the reason,I walk with the King. 
I walk with the King, hallelujah!
I walk with the King, praise His Name!
No longer I roam, my soul faces home,
I walk and I talk with the King. 

2.    For years in the fetters of sin I was bound,
The world could not help me, no comfort I found;
But now like the birds and the sunbeams of spring,
I'm free and rejoicing, I walk with the King. 
I walk with the King, hallelujah!
I walk with the King, praise His Name!
No longer I roam, my soul faces home,
I walk and I talk with the King. 

3.    O soul near despair in the lowlands of strife,
Look up and let Jesus come into your life;
The joy of salvation to you He would bring
Come into the sunlight and walk with the King. 
I walk with the King, hallelujah!
I walk with the King, praise His Name!
No longer I roam, my soul faces home,
I walk and I talk with the King. 

Listen to it here:    LISTEN1

Sunday, April 1, 2018

CHRIST THE LORD IS RISEN TODAY (TH#17)


TIMELESS HYMN #17 - A special feature where I highlight some of my favorite hymns that have been featured previously in this blog.  These entries are revised and expanded and shared again for your encouragement and challenge.  This hymn was first shared on April 20, 2014.


          Today is the most important day in the Christian calendar - Resurrection Day.  He is risen, He is risen indeed.  Today Christians celebrate the day that Christ was victor over death and the grave. When they came to visit His tomb that morning they found it empty. They shouldn't have been surprised because He himself proclaimed that He was the resurrection and the life.  And because He overcame these dreaded foes, we too can have eternal life, victory over sin and death and hope for tomorrow.  That is the truth and message that makes Christianity different than any other religion.  If Christ hadn't died and risen from the dead, He would be nothing more than another interesting man who roamed the earth for a few years trying to teach good moral ideas.  But He was the Word, He was with God, and He was God.  And He left all the riches and glory of heaven to come to earth and give His life as a sacrifice for our sins.  And He is risen.  The great hymn writer Charles Wesley experienced this new life which only Christ can give and a year after his conversion, in 1739, he penned these powerful words.  They were actually written for the inaugural service at the Foundry Meeting House, London's first Wesleyan chapel. Charles Wesley has often been called the "Bard of Methodism." His prominence in hymn writing may be judged from the fact that in the "Wesleyan Hymn Book" 623 of the 770 hymns included were written by him. He also published more than thirty poetical works, written either by himself alone, or in conjunction with his brother. The number of his separate hymns is believed to be at least five thousand.  Wesley's hymn, Christ the Lord is Risen Today, apparently originally had eight verses and three more were added in the 14th century by an unknown author.  However, over the years some of the words have been rearranged and today most hymnbooks contain the four familiar verses shown here.  As you celebrate this special day today, sing and meditate upon the powerful words and truth of Wesley's great hymn.

(1)    Christ, the Lord, is risen today, Alleluia!
Sons of men and angels say, Alleluia!
Raise your joys and triumphs high, Alleluia!
Sing, ye heavens, and earth, reply, Alleluia!

(2)    Lives again our glorious King, Alleluia!
Where, O death, is now thy sting? Alleluia!
Dying once He all doth save, Alleluia!
Where thy victory, O grave? Alleluia!

(3)    Love's redeeming work is done, Alleluia!
Fought the fight, the battle won, Alleluia!
Death in vain forbids His rise, Alleluia!
Christ hath opened paradise, Alleluia!

(4)   Soar we now where Christ hath led, Alleluia!
Following our exalted Head, Alleluia!
Made like Him, like Him we rise, Alleluia!
Ours the cross, the grave, the skies, Alleluia!

Listen to this great hymn here.   LISTEN

Sunday, March 25, 2018

ALL GLORY, LAUD AND HONOR


          Palm Sunday - the beginning of the most important week in the history of mankind.   It was during this week that Jesus was taken prisoner, crucified at Calvary, and then rose from the grave.  That week He bore the sins of all mankind and provided the way for forgiveness and reconciliation for all who accept His free gift.  Many hymns have been written about the life changing events of the end of that week, but few have been written about the events of that first day when people temporarily accepted Him as their king.  But in the 9th century,  Theodulph of Orleans (ca. 750-821) wrote a Latin text about the events of Palm Sunday and his writing survives today.  There are many interesting stories or legends about his writing of this hymn. one of which was shared by by a scholar named Clichtovius.  According to him,  Charlemagne was so impressed with Theodulph that he appointed him Bishop of Orleans in north central France where he ministered as a caring and reforming bishop. But after Charlemagne's death there was a power struggle within the royal household. His son and successor, Louis the Pious, suspected Theodulph of siding with his Italian rivals and had him imprisoned in the cloisters of Angers monastery in 818 AD. It was during this time of Pauline-like captivity that he wrote his great hymn 'Gloria,  Laus et Honor', 'All glory, laud and honour' .  One Palm Sunday Emperor Louis was present as a procession moved through the city and halted beneath the tower where the saint was imprisoned. Suddenly, to his astonishment, the emperor heard from above the Gloria Laus, chanted loudly and melodiously. Being charmed, he asked the name of the singer and was told that it was his own prisoner, Theodulph. Moved with compassion for him, the emperor pardoned the saint, returned him to his position and ordered that henceforth the hymn which Theodulph had composed be sung on Palm Sunday. In 1851, John Neale translated the hymn from Latin into English to be published in his Medieval Hymns and Sequences. Neale revised his translation in 1854 and revised it further in 1861 when it was published in Hymns Ancient and Modern.  The hymn originally consisted of thirty-nine verses.   Wouldn't you enjoy singing all of those verses during your Palm Sunday service?  Probably not.  Over the years verses have been eliminated and revised.  Strangely the hymn does not make mention of the other events of that week but it does remind us of that first day and the praises made to Jesus, the King and Blessed one.  The author does remind us that God is a God for all people (who in all good delightest), and not only for the chosen people who praised him during his entry into Jerusalem.  And Jesus does deserve all of our praise, glory, laud and honor.  May we honor Him that way, not only today, but every day of our lives.

1     All glory, laud, and honor 
to you, Redeemer, King, 
To whom the lips of children 
made sweet hosannas ring. 
Thou art the King of Israel 
and David's royal Son, 
who in the Lord's name comest, 
the King and Blessed One. 

2     The company of angels 
are praising Thee on high; 
And mortal men and all things
created make reply. 
The people of the Hebrews 
with palms before Thee went; 
Our praise and prayer and anthems 
before Thee we present. 

3     To Thee before Thy passion 
they sang their hymns of praise; 
to Thee, now high exalted, 
our melody we raise. 
Thou didst accept their praises, 
accept the praise we bring, 
Who in all good delightest, 
Thou good and gracious King! 

Here are several presentations of this hymn in different styles and with a few different verses and words.

Sunday, March 18, 2018

LEARNING TO LEAN


          We all know that the phrase "lean on" means to rest for support on something.  We've all done it physically and even emotionally.  For those of us who are getting older, we may reach a point that we need to lean upon a cane or even a walker.  Of course, it is important that the object you lean upon is stable and can support you.  Otherwise leaning on that might be dangerous.  And we seniors also reach a point where we often need to lean upon others to help us complete necessary tasks that at one time we could so  ourselves.  Then it is important that we have a reliable and trustworthy helper to lean upon.  But we don't need to be a senior to need someone to lean upon.  The challenges of life can be difficult at any age and we need the help of someone who is reliable, trustworthy and able to bear our needs. Unfortunately, too many turn to the wrong things or the wrong persons to lean upon.  Hopefully you've learned that the only One capable and willing to bear your load is Jesus.  And, hopefully, you are learning daily to lean upon Him and are experiencing the wisdom, love, guidance, peace and power which He alone can provide for those who trust Him.  This must have been the experience of John Stallings as he penned these words in 1980.  Stallings sang at age 6 at Soldier's Field in Chicago at a Gypsy Smith revival and he started preaching at the age of 16. He is a veteran Pastor/ Evangelist who has been called by many one of the greatest living Southern Gospel composers.  This particular song of his won Nashville's prestigious Dove award in 1977.   Incidentally he still writes a regular blog today (http://johnstallings.blogspot.com/).  What a comfort to know that there is One who we can lean upon and He wants to help us with all the details of our lives.  Why then do we fret or worry when He is always there for us?  Let's trust Him this week to do what He has promised.  "I'm learning to lean on Jesus."

1.     The joy I cant explain filled my soul
The day I made Jesus my king.
His Blessed Holy Spirit is leading my way,
He's teaching and I'm learning to lean.
Learning to lean, 
Learning to lean,
I'm learning to lean on Jesus.
Finding more power than I've ever dreamed,
I'm learning to lean on Jesus.

2.     Sad broken hearted, at an alter I knelt.
I found peace that was so serene.
And all that He asks is a child like trust,
And a heart that is learning to lean
Learning to lean, 
Learning to lean,
I'm learning to lean on Jesus.
Finding more power than I've ever dreamed,
I'm learning to lean on Jesus.

3.     There's a glorious victory, each day now for me.
I've found peace so serene.
He helps me with each task, If I'll only ask.
Everyday now I'm learning to lean.
Learning to lean, 
Learning to lean,
I'm learning to lean on Jesus.
Finding more power than I've ever dreamed,
I'm learning to lean on Jesus.

Listen to it here.   LISTEN 1
Here is another one with some historical information about this song.  LISTEN 2

Sunday, March 11, 2018

DARE TO BE A DANIEL



        In recent years there has been a sad change in the attitude of our culture towards those who stand for Biblical principles. Much of our society has become outspoken and critical of those who accept the literal Word of God and its teachings.  Christians are called intolerant and persecution has increased.  At times standing for Biblical principles will now cost a Christian their job, or maybe a fine, or their reputation, or maybe even their freedom to stand for what they know is Biblical truth.  Many years ago Daniel and his friends faced a ruler and a society where there were harsh penalties for worshipping the true God.  The convictions of three of Daniel's young friends brought them into conflict with King Nebuchadnezzar in Daniel 3. The king set up a monstrous idol, and commanded all to bow before it in worship (3:1, 4-5). Daniel does not enter the picture at this time, he may have been off somewhere in the empire doing business for the king. But the three Hebrews are definitely part of "Daniel's band" spiritually. They refuse to do as the king commands (vs. 16-18), and are throw into a roaring furnace (vs. 21). There they would be preserved by a mighty miracle of God (vs. 25, 28).  In the sixth chapter of Daniel we see the prophet, now an adult, put in jeopardy by his personal convictions. He had risen to a place of authority. And jealous leaders in the empire attempted to discredit him. Significantly, they had great trouble finding any fault in godly Daniel (vs. 5).  But they pressed the king (Darius, in this case) to pass a law forbidding anyone from making a request of any god, for thirty days, addressing their petitions only to the king during that time (vs. 7).  In spite of the edict, Daniel boldly continued his practice of praying three times a day, and made no attempt to hide it.   He was cast into a den of ravenous lions as a result but was protected by the Lord (vs. 16, 21-22).  A song which exhorts us to be faithful unto Jesus all of our lives in the same way that Daniel purposed not to defile himself is "Dare to Be a Daniel." The text was written and the tune (Daniel) was composed by Philip Paul Bliss (1838-1876). The song was produced for Bliss's Sunday school class at the First Congregational Church of Chicago, IL. and was copyrighted in 1873.  And while many consider it a song for children, it is a powerful reminder to all believers in the age in which we live. "Dare to be a Daniel, dare to stand alone! Dare to have a purpose firm! Dare to make it known."  The first verse tells us what to do.  The second tells us why we need to be brave.   The third tells us what we can accomplish.   And the fourth tells us how to go about our task.  Do we have a purpose firm? Are we willing to stand for it no matter what it may cost us?  We need to be prepared to do so in today's culture.  May the Lord grant us the wisdom and courage to stand for Him as the opposition increases.  Dare to be a Daniel, dare to stand alone.  How we need men and women of such conviction today!  Let it start with us.

1.     Standing by a purpose true,
Heeding God's command,
Honor them, the faithful few!
All hail to Daniel's band!
Dare to be a Daniel,
Dare to stand alone!
Dare to have a purpose firm!
Dare to make it known.

2.     Many mighty men are lost
Daring not to stand,
Who for God had been a host
By joining Daniel's band.
Dare to be a Daniel,
Dare to stand alone!
Dare to have a purpose firm!
Dare to make it known.

3,     Many giants, great and tall,
Stalking through the land,
 Headlong to the earth would fall,
If met by Daniel's band.
Dare to be a Daniel,
Dare to stand alone!
Dare to have a purpose firm!
Dare to make it known.

4.     Hold the Gospel banner high!
On to vict'ry grand!
Satan and his hosts defy,
And shout for Daniel's band.
Dare to be a Daniel,
Dare to stand alone!
Dare to have a purpose firm!
Dare to make it known.

Listen to it here.   LISTEN

Sunday, March 4, 2018

JUST AS I AM (#TH16)


TIMELESS HYMN #16 - Another revised and repeated blog of one of the great hymns of the faith - originally shared here on July 1, 20012


          This month it was relatively easy to choose a "timeless hymn" for my blog.  As I remember the ministry of Billy Graham I have many memories of this hymn being sung by George Beverly Shea or the crusade choirs as Billy gave an invitation to the crowds to accept Christ.  And I vividly remember watching hundreds respond to the call and have their lives changed by God's power and grace. Billy Graham was saved in 1934 in a revival meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina, led by evangelist Mordecai Ham, after hearing the invitation song "Just As I Am". This song later became the invitation song in the Billy Graham crusades.  The words were written by Charlotte Elliott (1789-1871), after a time of spiritual conflict during which she questioned the reality of her whole spiritual life. She had convinced herself that at midlife her physical disabilities left her nothing to offer God.  Elliott was struck by the words of a minister who asked whether she had truly given her heart to Christ. The question at first bothered Elliot and after some days she told the minister that she wanted to serve God but didn't know how. He replied, "Just come to him as you are."   After a night of restlessness she took a pen and paper and set down in writing, for her own comfort, "the formulae of her faith."  So in verse she restated to herself the Gospel of pardon, peace and heaven.  So out of her spiritual conflict and resolution came the words that have meant so much individually to thousands since that time.  The poem was originally used to raise money for a local hospital. It was first published in 1841 and then wedded with its familiar tune in 1849 by William Bradbury. It soon soared in popularity in 19th century evangelical revivals in the U.S. and Great Britain. However, while we normally associate this hymn with coming to Christ to secure salvation, I have come to see it in another light.  I recently heard of a pastor who asked that during his final hours of life that this hymn be played over and over for him.  Until then I never thought of this being a hymn that should be our testimony as we face eternity.  For in those moments we will have nothing else for our plea but what the Lamb of God has done for us.  And in our final days and hours we will come to Him with nothing else, nothing that we have done or even could have done to gain His merit.  Our only plea as we enter His presence will be His blood that was shed for us. 

(1)   Just as I am, without one plea,
But that Thy blood was shed for me,
And that Thou bidst me come to Thee,
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

(2)   Just as I am, and waiting not
To rid my soul of one dark blot,
To Thee whose blood can cleanse each spot,
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

(3)   Just as I am, though tossed about
With many a conflict, many a doubt,
Fightings and fears within, without,
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

(4)   Just as I am, poor, wretched, blind;
Sight, riches, healing of the mind,
Yea, all I need in Thee to find,
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

(5)   Just as I am, Thou wilt receive,
Wilt welcome, pardon, cleanse, relieve;
Because Thy promise I believe,
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

(6)   Just as I am, Thy love unknown
Hath broken every barrier down;
Now, to be Thine, yea, Thine alone,
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

Listen to it here.   LISTEN

Sunday, February 25, 2018

NUMBER 500!


          It was October 19, 2008 when I posted my first hymn in this blog.  Appropriately it was "Great Is Thy Faithfulness".  This blog started as a hobby, something to do in my retirement.  But it quickly turned into a ministry, as expressed in the many fine comments that readers have left over the year. Now over 900 folks come to this blog weekly. In fact, last week over 1,100 visited here.
          I can hardly believe it, but this week's post is actually  the 500th post I've made in this blog.  And to mark this fact I've decided to do something different this week and share my three personal favorite worship songs. Unfortunately they each seem to be lost or forgotten in the multitude of new worship songs that today seem to be written weekly.
          The first one shares my desire for this blog, "Glorify Your Name In All The Earth".  Amazingly this blog is now read worldwide, from Spain to the Ukraine, from Russia to Brazil and to many others.

Father, we love You
We worship and adore you
Glorify Your Name in all the earth
Glorify Your Name
Glorify Your Name
Glorify Your Name in all the earth

Jesus, we love You
We worship and adore You
Glorify Your Name in all the earth
Glorify Your Name
Glorify Your Name
Glorify Your Name in all the earth

Spirit, we love You
We worship and adore You
Glorify Your Name in all the earth
Glorify Your Name
Glorify Your Name
Glorify Your Name in all the earth

You can listen to it here.   LISTEN

          The second one shares my personal desire for my life.  It is simply "Praise You, Praise You, Let My Life Praise You."  And that is my daily prayer for my own life as well as for this blog.

Lord I come to you today,
With a simple prayer to pray.
In everything I do,
let my life O Lord praise you.
Praise you, praise you,praise you
let my life, praise you
praise you, praise you, praise you
let my life, O lord praise you

Lord you formed me out of clay,
and for your glory I was made.
Use this vessel as you choose.
Let my life O Lord praise you
Praise you, praise you,praise you
let my life, praise you
praise you, praise you,praise you
let my life, O Lord praise you

Let my life O Lord praise you.

You can listen to it here.   LISTEN

The third speaks for itself.
Down at Your feet, oh Lord
Is the most high place
In Your presence, Lord
I seek Your face, seek Your face

There is no higher calling, no greater honor
Then to bow and kneel before Your throne
I am amazed at Your glory, embraced by Your mercy

Oh Lord, I live to worship You

You can listen to it here.  LISTEN

          If you have been a regular reader of this blog, then thank you.  While I don't know who you are, your stopping by has been an encouragement to me.  Please consider leaving some comments when you visit.  And for those who have just dropped by this week, let me invite you to come here regularly.  Hopefully the great hymns and gospel songs that are shared here will challenge you and encourage you in your Christian walk.  And together we can praise and worship our amazing God.  God is so good, He's so good to me - all the time!  Praise Him!

Sunday, February 18, 2018

YESTERDAY, TODAY, FOREVER



        Lately a phrase from the hymn "Abide With Me" keeps flooding through my mind. "Change and decay in all around I see."  And how true that phrase is in today's world.  It often appears that everything around us is changing and often these changes are not for the good.  We long for a sure foundation and for stability and truths that we can depend upon.   And, thankfully, we find that only in Jesus Christ and His Word.  We marvel at the truth that centuries ago He came to this earth to pay the price for our salvation. That truth will never change. And while here on earth He performed many miracles, He healed the sick, He made the blind to see again, He made the lame to walk again, He comforted the poor and weak, He controlled the elements and He conquered the grave.  And that power has not changed. The amazing thing is that while He no longer walks on this earth, this same Jesus still cares for us and works in the lives of believers today.  "All may change, but Jesus never!"  And what a comfort that should be for us.  Based on Hebrews 13:8, "Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever", Albert Simpson (1843-1919) expressed this truth in this week's hymn choice.  Simpson was  a pastor and served mainly in U.S. churches, eventually founding the Christian and Missionary Alliance Church. In the early 1880's his health gave way and doctors told him that he had only a few months to live. However, Simpson experienced a dramatic healing, enabling him to continue in active ministry for another thirty-five years. He wrote about 170 hymns, most of them published in Alliance hymnbooks.  This particular hymn of his reminds us that the risen Savior is alive and that He hasn't changed. Nor will He ever.  His promises are still true.  He still walks beside His children. He still cares about all of our needs. He still is all powerful today as He was yesterday. May we never forget that.  All may change, but Jesus never!  Glory to His name. 


1.     O how sweet the glorious message simple faith may claim
Yesterday, today, forever Jesus is the same.
Still He loves to save the sinful, heal the sick and lame
Cheer the mourner, still the tempest, glory to His Name.
Yesterday, today, forever, Jesus is the same.
All may change, but Jesus never! Glory to His Name!
Glory to His Name! Glory to His Name!
All may change, but Jesus never! Glory to His Name!

2.     He, who was the Friend of sinners, seeks the lost one now
Sinner come, and at His footstool penitently bow
He Who said "I'll not condemn thee, go and sin no more,"
Speaks to thee that word of pardon as in days of yore.
Yesterday, today, forever, Jesus is the same.
All may change, but Jesus never! Glory to His Name!
Glory to His Name! Glory to His Name!
All may change, but Jesus never! Glory to His Name!

3.     Oft on earth He healed the sufferer by His mighty hand
Still our sicknesses and sorrows go at His command
He who gave His healing virtue to a woman's touch
To the faith that claims His fullness still will give as much.
Yesterday, today, forever, Jesus is the same.
All may change, but Jesus never! Glory to His Name!
Glory to His Name! Glory to His Name!
All may change, but Jesus never! Glory to His Name!

4.     As of old He walked to Emmaus, with them to abide
So through all life's way He walketh ever near our side
Soon again we shall behold Him, Hasten Lord the day
But twill still be this same Jesus as He went away.
Yesterday, today, forever, Jesus is the same.
All may change, but Jesus never! Glory to His Name!
Glory to His Name! Glory to His Name!
All may change, but Jesus never! Glory to His Name!

The following two verses are believed to also have been written by Simpson even though they do not usually appear in hymn books.

*  He who pardoned erring Peter never needst thou fear,
He who came to faithless Thomas all thy doubt will clear;
He who let the loved disciple on His bosom rest
Bids thee still, with love as tender, lean upon His breast.

* He who 'mid the raging billows walked upon the sea
Still can hush our wildest tempest, as on Galilee;
He who wept and prayed in anguish in Gethsemane
Drinks with us each cup of trembling, in our agony.

You can listen to it here.  LISTEN