Welcome!  Hymns have been and continue to be a real source of inspiration to me.  My desire in this blog is to share special hymns with my readers hoping that the words will minister to them, especially in times of great personal need.  If one of these hymns ministers to you, please take time to leave a comment so that I know that my blog is helping others as much as it helps me. Sometimes I will also provide a link where you can go to hear the hymn played.  So, please join me here each week and sing along as we praise God together.

Sunday, January 19, 2020

BLESSED ASSURANCE (TH)


TIMELESS HYMN  - Another revised and repeated blog of one of the great hymns of the faith - Lord You're Holy  - originally shared on August 20, 2008.  This is a great hymn of testimony to start a new year.



          All of us have enjoyed and have been touched by the many words written by the great blind hymn writer, Fanny Crosby. The themes for her hymns were often suggested by visiting ministers who wished to have a new song on a particular subject. It is amazing that, especially for a blind person, someone could write on this variety of spiritual truths and experiences with such proliferation. For a considerable period during her life, while under contract to a music publisher, she wrote three new hymns each week. She used over 200 pen names. Many of her original texts are still being uncovered and perhaps might be found and published in the future. About 500 of her hymns were accompanied by the music of an amateur musician, Mrs. Phoebe Knapp, the wife of the second president of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. She attended the same church as Fanny and kept a pipe organ in her apartment to help her compose. One day Fanny was visiting her friend Phoebe as the Knapp home was having the large pipe organ installed. The organ was incomplete so, using the piano, Phoebe played a new melody she had just composed. "What do you think the tune says?" she asked. "Blessed assurance, Jesus is mine", answered Fanny Crosby. And with that inspiration, Fanny penned the words of this great hymn of testimony which is still being sung today in many churches. And what a powerful message it contains. We have the assurance that Jesus is ours and His praise should be on our lips all day long. I also marvel at how a blind person can talk about sight as she does with the phrase "Visions of rapture now burst on my sight." Then later she says that she is "watching and waiting, and looking above". Then she ends with the testimony "filled with His goodness, lost in His love". What a joy to have this blessed assurance in your life, that Jesus, your Savior, is yours for eternity.


(1)    Blessed assurance, Jesus is mine!
O what a foretaste of glory divine!
Heir of salvation, purchase of God,
Born of His Spirit, washed in His blood.
This is my story, this is my song,
Praising my Savior, all the day long;
This is my story, this is my song,
Praising my Savior, all the day long.

(2)    Perfect submission, perfect delight,
Visions of rapture now burst on my sight;
Angels descending bring from above
Echoes of mercy, whispers of love.
This is my story, this is my song,
Praising my Savior, all the day long;
This is my story, this is my song,
Praising my Savior, all the day long.

(3)    Perfect submission, all is at rest
I in my Savior am happy and blest,
Watching and waiting, looking above,
Filled with His goodness, lost in His love.
This is my story, this is my song,
Praising my Savior, all the day long;
This is my story, this is my song,
Praising my Savior, all the day long.

Listen to it here    ASSURANCE

Sunday, January 12, 2020

NOR SILVER NOR GOLD


        Most of us have at one time in our lives wished that we had more money so that we could purchase expensive things that we wish for ... a more expensive home, a better car, an elaborate vacation, a large retirement fund ... things that we often dream about.  But unless we get a large inheritance, win the lottery, get a major promotion or go deeper into debt , we will probably never be able to afford all of our dreams.  But all the money (gold and silver) in the world could never purchase the most important thing in life - eternal life in heaven.  None of our expensive toys will ever gain us entrance into God's home in heaven. "Ye were not redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold … but with the precious blood of Christ." 1 Peter 1:18–19.  Our eternal salvation cannot be bought with money, or with good works, or with church membership or rituals either. In fact, it was already paid for at Calvary. Now, it's a free gift of God, received by faith in our Saviour and what He did for us on the cross (Jn. 3:16). The purchase price was neither silver nor gold, but what the Apostle Peter calls "the precious [esteemed, as of great price] blood of Christ."  And this is the truth that James M. Gray (1851-1935) shared when he penned this song in 1900 while he served as a teacher in the summer sessions of Moody Bible Institute, in Chicago. Gray accepted Christ at age 22.  In 1879 he became Rector of the First Reformed Episcopal Church in Boston where he served 14 years. He then became dean (1904-25) and president (1925-34) of the Moody Bible Institute, and directed publication of four editions (1921-28) of the Voice of Thanksgiving, official hymnal of the Institute.  A conservative theologian, Gray was one of seven editors of the popular Scofield Reference Bible.   In this hymn he shares several things that have been dealt with through faith in the shed blood of Christ.  It paid the debt we owed and purchased us out of the slave market of sin. It also solved the problem of our guilt, removed the barrier to our access to God, and provided an eternal future in heaven for us.  And none of these things could be purchased with all of the money in this world.  It is a gift to those who believe, no matter how rich or poor they may be.  May we always remember that we are "Bought with a price - the blood of Jesus, precious price of love untold."

1     Nor silver nor gold hath obtained my redemption,
Nor riches of earth could have saved my poor soul;
The blood of the cross is my only foundation,
The death of my Savior now maketh me whole.
Chorus:
I am redeemed, but not with silver;
I am bought, but not with gold;
Bought with a price - the blood of Jesus,
Precious price of love untold.

2     Nor silver nor gold hath obtained my redemption,
The guilt on my conscience too heavy had grown;
The blood of the cross is my only foundation,
The death of my Savior could only atone. 
Chorus:
I am redeemed, but not with silver;
I am bought, but not with gold;
Bought with a price - the blood of Jesus,
Precious price of love untold.

3     Nor silver nor gold hath obtained my redemption,
The holy commandment forbade me draw near;
The blood of the cross is my only foundation,
The death of my Savior removeth my fear. 
Chorus:
I am redeemed, but not with silver;
I am bought, but not with gold;
Bought with a price - the blood of Jesus,
Precious price of love untold.

4     Nor silver nor gold hath obtained my redemption,
The way into heaven could not thus be bought;
The blood of the cross is my only foundation,
The death of my Savior redemption hath wrought. 
Chorus:
I am redeemed, but not with silver;
I am bought, but not with gold;
Bought with a price - the blood of Jesus,
Precious price of love untold.

Listen to it here     PRICE

Sunday, January 5, 2020

ANOTHER YEAR IS DAWNING (TH)

TIMELESS HYMN - A special monthly feature where I highlight some of my favorite hymns that have been featured previously in this blog.  These entries are revised and expanded and shared again for our encouragement and challenge.  This hymn was first shared here on January 8, 2012

In January of 1874, the many friends of Frances Ridley Havergal (1836-1879) received a New Year's greeting with the heading, "A Happy New Year! Ever Such May it Be!" Following this greeting appeared her text, still considered to be one of the finest New Year's prayers of consecration ever written. One can well imagine that those who received this greeting card from Miss Havergal that year read her words thoughtfully. They were written by one who had already become widely known throughout England as "the consecration poet." It was said of her that she always lived her words before she wrote them. Her life was one of constant and complete commitment to God. Her many talents - an accomplished pianist and vocalist, proficiency in seven languages, a keen mind (memorization of the entire New Testament, Psalms, Isaiah, and the Minor Prophets) - were all dedicated to serving God and others during the new year. Personally, after the deaths of loved ones, I especially enjoy her closing lines "Another year is dawning, dear Father, let it be on earth or else in Heaven, another year for Thee". Numerous melodies have been used with these words but probably the most well known is the tune to "The Church's One Foundation".  So as we begin the new year, and a new decade, may this hymn be the prayer of our hearts.  And may you have a blessed and productive 2020.

1     Another year is dawning! 
Dear Father, let it be, 
in working or in waiting, 
another year with thee; 
another year of leaning 
upon thy loving breast, 
another year of trusting, 
of quiet, happy rest.

2     Another year of mercies, 
of faithfulness and grace; 
another year of gladness 
in the shining of thy face; 
another year of progress,
another year of praise,
another year of proving
thy presence all the days.

3     Another year of service, 
of witness for thy love; 
another year of training 
for holier work above. 
Another year is dawning! 
Dear Father, let it be
on earth, or else in heaven, 
another year for thee.

You can listen to it here.    NEW YEAR

Sunday, December 29, 2019

HOW CAN I KEEP FROM SINGING?



        "The Lord is my strength and shield.  I trust him with all my heart.  He helps me, and my heart is filled with joy.   I burst out in songs of thanksgiving."   Psalm 28:7 (NLT)  What a testimony and message to begin a new year.  Can you say that as you reflect upon the Lord's care and provision during the past year that it makes you want to burst out in singing?  That is the message shared in this week's hymn choice.  How can I keep from singing?  Many sources give credit for its writing to Robert Lowry (1826-1899).  It is said that he was a man of rare administrative ability, a most excellent preacher, a thorough Bible student, and whether in the pulpit or upon the platform, always a brilliant and interesting speaker. He is also remembered for his work and writing in music. His melodies are sung in every civilized land, and many of his hymns have been translated into various languages. While preaching the Gospel was his lifework, music and hymnology were his favorite studies. But they were always a side issue, a recreation.  Lowry frequently said that he regarded "Weeping Will Not Save Me" as the best and most evangelistic hymn he ever wrote. The following are some of his most popular gospel melodies: "Shall We Gather at the River?," "One More Day's Work for Jesus," "Where is My Wandering Boy Tonight?," "I Need Thee Every Hour," "The Mistakes of My Life," "How Can I Keep from Singing?," "All the Way My Saviour Leads Me," "Saviour, Thy Dying Love," and "We're Marching to Zion."   But getting back to this week's hymn, there are numerous other verses and claims of authorship.  For example, Doris Plenn claims to have learned the original hymn from her grandmother, who reportedly believed that it dated from the early days of the Quaker movement. Plenn contributed a verse around 1950 which was taken up by Pete Seeger and other folk singers.  So no matter who wrote all the words or which version you accept, the message is the same.   "No storm can shake my inmost calm while to that Rock I'm clinging. Since Christ is Lord of heaven and earth, how can I keep from singing?"  And remember we are told in Ephesians 5:18-20,  " ... be filled with the Holy Spirit,  singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs among yourselves, and making music to the Lord in your hearts. And give thanks for everything to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ. "  May your new year be filled with an endless song coming from a thankful heart! 

1      My life flows on in endless song;
above earth's lamentation,
I catch the sweet, though far-off hymn
that hails a new creation.
Refrain:
No storm can shake my inmost calm
while to that Rock I'm clinging.
Since Christ is Lord of heaven and earth,
how can I keep from singing?

2      Through all the tumult and the strife,

I hear that music ringing.
It finds an echo in my soul.
How can I keep from singing?
Refrain:
No storm can shake my inmost calm
while to that Rock I'm clinging.
Since Christ is Lord of heaven and earth,
how can I keep from singing?

3      What though my joys and comforts die?

I know my Savior liveth.
What though the darkness gather round?
Songs in the night he giveth. 
Refrain:
No storm can shake my inmost calm
while to that Rock I'm clinging.
Since Christ is Lord of heaven and earth,
how can I keep from singing?

4      The peace of Christ makes fresh my heart,

a fountain ever springing!
All things are mine since I am his!
How can I keep from singing? 
Refrain:
No storm can shake my inmost calm
while to that Rock I'm clinging.
Since Christ is Lord of heaven and earth,
how can I keep from singing?

Listen to it here.   LISTEN

Sunday, December 22, 2019

AWAY IN A MANGER (TH)


TIMELESS HYMN - A special monthly feature where I highlight some of my favorite hymns that have been featured previously in this blog.  These entries are revised and expanded and shared again for our encouragement and challenge.  This hymn was first shared here on December 25, 2011



          One of the very first Christmas carols that children learn to sing is the familiar "Away In A Manger".  This carol shares some of the things that baby Jesus might have experienced upon his birth in the stable in Bethlehem.  But the carol is also a simple prayer for the Lord's presence in the daily lives of those who sing it.  What a simple but profound song.  But there are numerous opinions about the writing of this carol. According to Wikipedia, the online dictionary, the song was first published with two verses in an Evangelical Lutheran Sunday School collection, "Little Children's Book for Schools and Families" (1885).  It bore the title "Away in a Manger" and was set to a tune called "St. Kilda" by J.E. Clark. For many years the text was credited to the German reformer Martin Luther. Research has shown, however, that this is nothing more than a fable. In the book "Dainty Songs for Little Lads and Lasses" (1887) the song has the title "Luther's Cradle Hymn" and the note, "composed by Martin Luther for his children, and still sung by German mothers to their little ones." A possible reason for the attribution to Luther is that the 400th anniversary of his birth was in 1883 and the words were either based on a poem written for this anniversary or were credited to Luther as a clever marketing gimmick. However this song has never been found in Luther's works. The third stanza, "Be near me, Lord Jesus" was first printed in Gabriel's "Vineyard Songs" (1892), where it appeared with a tune by Charles H. Gabriel (simply marked "C").  So these words are probably by Gabriel. Gabriel credited the entire text to Luther and gave it the title "Cradle Song." But no matter who actually wrote it, it has been part of most Christmas celebrations for many years. The thoughts and words can easily be understood and appreciated by those of all ages.  It includes prayers for the new Savior to stay by our side, to be near us, to love us and some day to take us to heaven to live with Him there.  I think my favorite line is "I love Thee Lord Jesus".  And that should be our daily prayer. Now let's not forget that the Babe born in the manger was the same Son of God who later hung on the cross and then rose from the dead for the payment of mankind's sins. And if you have never accepted Him as your personal Savior, doing so today would be the greatest Christmas gift you could ever receive.

(1) Away in a manger,
No crib for His bed
The little Lord Jesus
Laid down His sweet head
The stars in the sky
Looked down where He lay
The little Lord Jesus
Asleep on the hay

(2) The cattle are lowing
The poor Baby wakes
But little Lord Jesus
No crying He makes
I love Thee, Lord Jesus
Look down from the sky
And stay by my side,
'Til morning is nigh.

(3) Be near me, Lord Jesus,
I ask Thee to stay
Close by me forever
And love me I pray
Bless all the dear children
In Thy tender care
And take us to heaven
To live with Thee there

Listen to it here    AWAY

Sunday, December 15, 2019

THAT BEAUTIFUL NAME


          "You shall call His name JESUS," Joseph was told (Matthew 1:21), as was Mary (Luke 1:31). In His miraculous conception and His birth, "The Word [God the Son] became flesh and dwelt among us" (John 1:1, 14).   What a beautiful, wonderful and matchless name, the sweetest name of all to every believer.  And in Philippians 2:10 we are told that someday ... "at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth."  It was this beautiful name that was the motivation for Jean Perry (1865-1935) to pen the words of this week's hymn choice.  Little is known of Jean Perry, beyond her name, and the years of her birth and death.  But an interesting story centers around the tune which was written by Mabel Johnston Camp. Apparently, the hymn poem was given to her by the author and she attempted to compose a tune to suit it. Dissatisfied with the result, she tore up the manuscript and dropped it in the waste basket. But her husband came by, some time later, and spotted the scraps. On a whim, he took them up and patiently fitted the pieces back together. Norman Camp believed the music provided a lovely setting for the words, and he convinced his wife to have the song published. And as a result this hymn has ministered to many over the years.  As we enter the Christmas season this year, the words of this hymn should remind us again of the miraculous birth and impact of Jesus.  The author went on to share how He became the Savior when He bore our sins on the cross of Calvary.  May we never forget this amazing truth.  And finally the author shares how this truth was whispered in her heart many years ago, how to Jesus she gave her life and how she was freed from the power of sin.  Hopefully that is also your testimony.  And if it is, join in singing this testimony hymn this week.  Be reminded of how beautiful and matchless is the name and power of Jesus!


1      I know of a name, 
A beautiful name,
That angels bro't down to earth;
They whispered it low 
One night long ago,
To a maiden of lowly birth.
Refrain:
That beautiful name, 
That beautiful name,
From sin has power to free us!
That beautiful name, 
That wonderful name,
That matchless name is Jesus!

2      I know of a name, 
A beautiful name,
That unto a Babe was given;
The stars glittered bright 
Thro'out that glad night,
And angels praised God in heav'n. 
Refrain:
That beautiful name, 
That beautiful name,
From sin has power to free us!
That beautiful name, 
That wonderful name,
That matchless name is Jesus!


3      The One of that name, 
My Savior became,
My Savior of Calvary;
My sins nailed Him there, 
My burdens He bare.
He suffered all this for me. 
Refrain:
That beautiful name, 
That beautiful name,
From sin has power to free us!
That beautiful name, 
That wonderful name,
That matchless name is Jesus!

4      I love that blest name, 
That wonderful name,
Made higher than all in heaven;
'Twas whispered, I know, 
In my heart long ago,
To Jesus my life I've given. 
Refrain:
That beautiful name, 
That beautiful name,
From sin has power to free us!
That beautiful name, 
That wonderful name,
That matchless name is Jesus!

Listen to it here    BEAUTIFUL

Sunday, December 8, 2019

VERILY, VERILY I SAY UNTO YOU




        How often today do we sing any gospel song that includes the phrase "verily, verily"?  It's not a word in our vocabulary today. But Jesus used the word verily many times as he taught.  It means truly or certainly.  Saying, "Verily, verily," before making a statement is a strong claim to its truth.   Jesus is not merely saying, "Believe me, this is true."  He is actually saying, "I know this is true firsthand." So, when we read Jesus' words and see statements beginning with "verily," "truly," or some variation, we should recall the deeper meaning. Those claims are not only Jesus' opinion on the truth. Those are ideas about which He has intimate, personal, firsthand knowledge.  And so that was the case when in John 5:24 Jesus said, "Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life."  As a result we should believe it and claim it. It is said that this was the favorite verse of James McGranahan (1840-1907) and also the motivation in 1878 for his writing of this week's hymn choice.  He  was an American Gospel song and hymn writer who  also wrote the music for such familiar hymns as "Christ Returneth!," "There Shall Be Showers of Blessing," and "The Banner of the Cross," as well as both the words and music for "Verily, Verily," and "Go Ye into All the World."  During his life he composed over 25 hymns.  Now this song of his is a song that I have not heard or sung in decades.  But it brings back many good memories of hearing it sung joyfully in services when I was growing up.  Think of the words.  What a thrill to know that He has set us free from all condemnation.  He paid all of our indebtedness.  And even though we are unworthy, weak and sinful, He will not cast us out.  And He assures us that we have everlasting life because of what He has done for us and our response to Him. Verily, verily - it's true!  What a great Savior!  Rejoice in this truth!


1     Oh, what a Savior that He died for me!
From condemnation He hath made me free;
"He that believeth on the Son" saith He,
"Hath everlasting life."
"Verily, verily, I say unto you;"
"Verily, verily," message ever new!
"He that believeth on the Son"-'tis true! -
 "Hath everlasting life!"

2     All my iniquities on Him were laid,
All my indebtedness by Him was paid;
All who believe on Him, the Lord hath said,
"Hath everlasting life."
"Verily, verily, I say unto you;"
"Verily, verily," message ever new!
"He that believeth on the Son" -'tis true! -
"Hath everlasting life!"

3     Though poor and needy, I can trust my Lord;
Though weak and sinful, I believe His word;
Oh, glad message; every child of God
"Hath everlasting life."
 Verily, verily, I say unto you;"
"Verily, verily," message ever new!
"He that believeth on the Son" -'tis true! -
"Hath everlasting life!"

4     Though all unworthy, yet I will not doubt;
For him that cometh He will not cast out:
"He that believeth" - oh, the good news shout!
 Hath everlasting life."
 Verily, verily, I say unto you;"
"Verily, verily," message ever new!
"He that believeth on the Son" - 'tis true! -
"Hath everlasting life!"

Listen to it here    VERILY

Sunday, December 1, 2019

THERE IS A FOUNTAIN FILLED WITH BLOOD (TH)


TIMELESS HYMN  - Another revised and repeated blog of one of the great hymns of the faith - There Is A Fountain Filled With Blood  - originally shared here on June 6, 2010.


          William Cowper (1731 - 1800) studied to become an attorney but he never actually practiced law. He struggled from manic depression and often felt that he was doomed to eternal damnation and hell. He made several attempts at drinking poison only to have spasms in his hand which prevented him from doing so. He then tried to hang himself with a strong garter. He passed out and then the garter broke while he was still suspended. He struggled with knowing that God could forgive him for this attempt. After having significant difficulties battling depression, he had a mental breakdown and was sent to a mental hospital. There Cowper found a Bible on a bench. He opened it and read it. He turned to the account of Lazarus being raised from the dead, which he said showed him the mercy of the Savior. He also turned to Romans 3:25 where he read, “Christ Jesus, whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness.” It was upon reading this verse that Cowper said he was immediately converted.  Cowper was able to regain his mental health, and he left the hospital. He ended up in the town of Olney where John Newton was a pastor. Newton recognized Cowper’s gift as a poet, and he encouraged him to write hymns. And that Cowper did. He wrote sixty-eight hymns in a fairly short period of time. Today's hymn was the first hymn he wrote after his recovery. It is evident that the Lord worked in him and gave him the assurance of forgiveness. There are many interesting stories told about the impact of this great hymn. One has to do with a large religious service conducted at the Golden Gate Exposition in San Francisco. The gifted speaker began to direct most of his eloquence against the power of the blood of Christ. When he was done, an elderly lady stood up in the midst of the crowd and softly began to sing this hymn as a touching rebuttal to the speaker's remarks. A hush fell over the audience as they listened. But before she could begin the second verse, about one hundred people rose to join her. By the time they reached the third verse, nearly a thousand were singing along. The triumphant, thrilling strains rang out - "Dear dying Lamb, Thy precious blood shall never lose its power, 'til all the ransomed church of God be saved to sin no more." The message, written by one cured by the Lord from deep depression, still rings out today in the hearts of those who've experienced the power of the blood of Christ.  Have you experienced this power and transformation?

(1) There is a fountain filled with blood
drawn from Emmanuel's veins;
and sinners plunged beneath that flood
lose all their guilty stains.
Lose all their guilty stains,
lose all their guilty stains;
and sinners plunged beneath that flood
lose all their guilty stains.

(2) The dying thief rejoiced to see
that fountain in his day;
and there may I, though vile as he,
wash all my sins away.
Wash all my sins away,
wash all my sins away;
and there may I, though vile as he,
wash all my sins away.

(3) Dear dying Lamb, thy precious blood
shall never lose its power
till all the ransomed church of God
be saved, to sin no more.
Be saved, to sin no more,
be saved, to sin no more;
till all the ransomed church of God
be saved, to sin no more.

(4) E'er since, by faith, I saw the stream
thy flowing wounds supply,
redeeming love has been my theme,
and shall be till I die.
And shall be till I die,
and shall be till I die;
redeeming love has been my theme,
and shall be till I die.

(5) Then in a nobler, sweeter song,
I'll sing thy power to save,
when this poor lisping, stammering tongue
lies silent in the grave.
Lies silent in the grave,
lies silent in the grave;
when this poor lisping, stammering tongue
lies silent in the grave.

Listen to it here. LISTEN

Sunday, November 24, 2019

COME CHRISTIAN, JOIN TO SING

          My wife and I are big Penn State football fans.  Before our physical challenges prevented us from going, we often were able to attend five or six home games each year.  We enjoyed the enthusiasm of the band, the excitement of the fans and the general atmosphere.  It was stirring to hear the 105,000 fans cheer “We are ... Penn State!”  Now we watch the games on television but we miss the thrill of being there. Sports fans can be enthusiastic. Likewise, concertgoers raise their hands and swoon at rock stars. Supporters clap, cheer and throw confetti for leading politicians. So why shouldn’t Christians unite their hearts, souls and minds and raise their voices and cheer for the lover of souls, the giver of good things, the creator of the universe, the all-powerful glorious one, the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end?  “O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise.” (Psalm 51:15).  King David was eager to worship. “I was glad when they said to me, ‘Let us go to the house of the Lord!’” (Psalm 122:1). And he had so much enthusiasm, dancing before the Lord when the ark returned to Jerusalem, that his wife was embarrassed by his behavior (2 Samuel 6:14-16).  Christian Henry Bateman (1813-1899) was ordained into the Church of England after being a Congregational minister.  He is credited as being the author of this hymn although there are some who believe that Bateman’s hymn is actually  a rewritten version of the hymn “Join Now in Praise, and Sing” by William Edward Hickson (1803-1870).  But no matter who actually wrote it, the hymn is a challenge to Christians to join in praising the Creator.  Each stanza begins with an exhortation - an imperative command to “Come” or “Praise.” In stanza one, Bateman provides us with the reason for singing - We offer “loud praise to Christ our King  ... before his throne ... ”   Christ desires our praise - “praise is his gracious choice. . . .”  Stanza two reassures all of us that this King is also “our guide and friend” and that “his love shall never end.”  This King will “condescend” to be our friend. To condescend surely did not mean to patronize as it tends to mean today, but implies that Christ the King humbles himself to be in a personal relationship with us.  Stanza three reassures us that we need not fear death. Beyond life, our songs will continue on “heaven’s blissful shore  ...  singing forevermore: Alleluia! Amen!”  Football games and concerts are fun. Political events are important. But a greater priority is to worship God. Why not praise Him with the enthusiasm of a Super Bowl fan, the adoration of a music enthusiast, and the zeal of a political supporter?  Pray for this nation to recognize the awesomeness of God and give Him the praise due to His name.

1    Come, Christians, join to sing
Alleluia! Amen!
loud praise to Christ our King;
Alleluia! Amen!
let all, with heart and voice,
before his throne rejoice;
praise is his gracious choice.
Alleluia! Amen!

2    Come, lift your hearts on high,
Alleluia! Amen!
let praises fill the sky;
Alleluia! Amen!
he is our Guide and Friend;
to us he’ll condescend;
his love shall never end.
Alleluia! Amen!

3    Praise yet our Christ again,
Alleluia! Amen!
life shall not end the strain;
Alleluia! Amen!
on heaven’s blissful shore,
his goodness we’ll adore,
singing forevermore,
"Alleluia! Amen!”


Listen to it here.  COME