Welcome!  Hymns have been and continue to be a real source of inspiration to me.  My desire in this blog is to share special hymns with my readers hoping that the words will minister to them, especially in times of great personal need.  If one of these hymns ministers to you, please take time to leave a comment so that I know that my blog is helping others as much as it helps me. Sometimes I will also provide a link where you can go to hear the hymn played.  So, please join me here each week and sing along as we praise God together.

Sunday, March 15, 2015

OH WHEN I COME TO THE END OF MY JOURNEY


         It is interesting how unexpected events can bring back to one's memory a song or a hymn that one hasn't heard for years.  This was the case for me recently when the GPS on our new car frequently used the phrase "turn at the end of the road" to give us directions when we approached a T in the roads.  After hearing this numerous times my mind began to recall the old Gospel song in which the first line of the chorus says "Oh when I come to the end of my journey."  The words to this song were penned by Lucie Eddie Campbell (1885-1963), an African American composer of hymns.  She was the youngest of nine children. Her mother, a widow, not only wanted her children to receive an education, but she also wanted them exposed to the performing arts.  She elected to give piano lessons to Lora, Lucie's older sister. While piano lessons were being given to Lora, Lucie listened attentively and practiced the lessons on her own. At the age of nineteen, Lucie organized a group of musicians into a Music Club. Other members later were added to form a thousand-voice choir that performed at the National Baptist Convention. She was also an activist for civil justice. She defied the Jim Crow streetcar laws when she refused to relinquish her seat in the section reserved for whites, and as president of the Negro Education Association she struggled with governmental officials to redress the inequities in the pay scale and other benefits for Negro teachers.  The National Sunday School and the Baptist Training Union Congress of the National Baptist Convention showed its appreciation to its "first lady of music" when it declared June 20, 1962, as Lucie E. Campbell Appreciation Day. While preparing to attend the celebration and banquet held in her honor, she suddenly became gravely ill and was rushed to hospital.  After a six-months' bout with illness, she died on January 3, 1963, in Nashville.  I could not find anything about the actual writing of this song but I can imagine that it may have been written as a result of her life experiences.   She knew that life can be challenging and at times discouraging.  And often our attempts to share the Gospel will be rejected.  But she reminds us of how our Savior was also misunderstood and was hung on the cross.  But the joy of the song is that there is a time coming when our labor will be ended and we will be rewarded for our service.   There will be a day when the One who understands our journey will say the words "Well done".  The last verse is also an encouragement to keep going no matter what the circumstances.  And Paul also echoed that challenge in Galatians 6:9, "And let us not be weary in well doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not."  Are you weary and tired today in the journey?  Do you feel that you have failed and that you've given the best but have come up short?  Then be encouraged, He understands and one day will say "well done".


(1)     If when you give the best of your service
Telling the world that the Saviour has come
Be not dismayed when men don't believe you
He'll understand and say well done 
Oh when I come to the end of my journey
Weary of life and the battle is won 
Carrying the staff and the cross of redemption 
He'll understand and say well done

(2)     Misunderstood the Saviour of sinners
Hung on the cross He was God's only son
Oh, hear Him calling His Father in Heaven
Lord, not my will, but Thine be done.
Oh when I come to the end of my journey
Weary of life and the battle is won 
Carrying the staff and the cross of redemption 
He'll understand and say well done

(3)     Oh when this life of labor is ended
And the reward of the race you have run
Oh the sweet rest that's prepared for the faithful
Will be his blest and final "Well done"
Oh when I come to the end of my journey
Weary of life and the battle is won 
Carrying the staff and the cross of redemption 
He'll understand and say well done

(4)     If when you've tried and failed in your trying, 
hands sore and scarred from the work you've begun 
Take up your cross and come quickly to Jesus,
He'll understand and say well done
Oh when I come to the end of my journey
Weary of life and the battle is won 
Carrying the staff and the cross of redemption 
He'll understand and say well done

Listen to it here.    LISTEN

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